Homeland Security

Maoists : China's Proxy Soldiers
Star Rating Loader Please wait...
Issue Vol 25.3 Jul-Sep2010 | Date : 06 Oct , 2010

General SK Sinha, former governor wrote in the newspaper ‘Pioneer’ (6 June 2010): “One Maoist gets killed against four deaths against civilians and security personnel in the rebel affected areas. Incidentally, the causality rate in J&K even at the peak of militancy was equal on both sides.”

While we Indians are sensitized about the ongoing proxy war by Pakistan, there is very little or no consciousness that Maoism or Naxalism is actually a proxy war by China being waged against India for last five decades. The Maoist movement in India, as it is made out to be, is not a recent phenomenon, but has been impacting the Indian state in varying intensity, depending on the international environment and the type of dispensation of the Union of India.

When more than 70 CRPF personnel were martyred in Chattisgarh, some students of a university in Delhi, created for pioneering research but now considered a leftist bastion, celebrated the tragedy. Some students of the same university had celebrated the Tianamen Square massacre of students in China in 1989 for what they thought was necessary to prevent China going down the Soviet Union way. This university does not lie in the ‘impoverished, underdeveloped and exploited tribal mineral heartland of India’. Its students thrive in excellent facilities made possible by the tax-payers money.

“¦ there are attempts to create many such pro-China leftists and ultra-leftists segments in other universities in places like Kurukshetra and Dehradun, some in the name of highly revered Indian figures like Shaheed Bhagat Singh.

As per intelligence inputs, there are attempts to create many such pro-China leftists and ultra-leftists segments in other universities in places like Kurukshetra and Dehradun, some in the name of highly revered Indian figures like Shaheed Bhagat Singh. The stranglehold of China’s over the most of the leftist parties/organizations in India including the Maoists is hard to explain. The symbiosis and linkages between China and these organizations has not been researched or investigated either by design or by conscious omission.

It would be naïve not to read the writing on the wall. There are many apologists of China in every strata and segment of the Indian society, who insist on direct evidence of the China-Maoists nexus. The same constituency earlier argued that there was no evidence of China providing WMD technology to Pakistan Countries, like China that aid and abet insurgencies in other countries, are conscious enough of maintaining the deniability factor especially when it comes to physical evidence. However, if one were to delve into the mindset and posturing of the Maoist leadership and the Chinese leaders, the nexus between the two is more than evident.

“China’s Chairman is our Chairman”

Charu Mazumdar, the pioneer of the naxalite movement had said: “China’s Chairman is our Chairman and China’s path is our path”. The naxalites maintained a studied silence even as the Pakistan Army committed genocide in the Bangladesh because China was an ally of Pakistan. They never condemned the murderous Khmer Rouge in Cambodia. They have, like the Maoists in Nepal, never criticized the Chinese occupation of Tibet. However, the Maoist leader Kishanji in an interview unequivocally said that he supported the cause of independence of Kashmir, Nagaland, Assam and others. He has no qualms about India being splintered in the process.

The cardinal mistake that India made after independence was to give legitimacy to the Communists and respectability to criminals like Mao.

India’s Cardinal Mistake

Maoism is indeed fallout of the communist movement in India. The communist movement during the initial years after India’s independence had violent overtones. Realizing its futility, the communist leadership then decided to opt for the electoral route. It did pay dividends, as for the first time, anywhere in the world; a democratically elected communist government came to power in Kerala in 1957. It is touted as a great victory for the Indian historical trait of assimilation, but it has not been without a price in the form of left-wing extremism, which has constantly spurned the assimilative process at the behest of external powers particularly China. The cardinal mistake that India made after independence was to give legitimacy to the Communists and respectability to criminals like Mao.

The expansion of the international communist movement suffered a great setback after the Sino-Soviet split in early 60s, as also due to the Vietnam war. This spawned ultra leftist groups and movements in many parts of the world. They were aided and abetted by China in a manner that the deniability factor could be maintained. It was during this period that the naxalite phenomenon in India began to take shape and had become a great threat to the integrity of India by 1969. The Naxalite leader Charu Mazumdar had exhorted his cadres ‘to expand anywhere and everywhere’. When the Naxals launched ‘Spring Thunder’ in Naxalbari, the Chinese Community Party mouthpiece wrote in its editorial comment in 1967, “A peal of a Spring Thunder has crashed over the land of India.” The editorial offered moral support from the highest level of China.

The Sino-India war had reverberations on the Indian communist movement, wherein a very strong section of the movement took a pro-Chinese position on the plea that the conflict was between a socialist and a capitalist state. There emerged three groups in the communist party i.e. the nationalists, the centrists, and the internationalists. A sizeable segment of the movement rejected Deng’s ‘capitalism in China’. This explains the reason for the current animosity between the two. Nevertheless, there is one thing common between them, i.e. total subservience to China.

It is for this reason that there has never been the slightest condemnation for any omissions and commissions by China. To them China is infallible. But be it India’s nuclear tests or Indo-US nuclear deal or Indo-US military exercises or India’s assistance to Nepal, they never miss an opportunity to spit venom against India.

“¦ a democratically elected communist government came to power in Kerala in 1957. It is touted as a great victory for the Indian historical trait of assimilation, but it has not been without a price in the form of left-wing extremism “¦

Over the period, the ultra-leftist movement has engendered many splinter groups, some more extremist than the other. In the past, some of these groups were involved in a vicious internecine conflict. It was only in 2004 that CPI (Maoists), was formed after the merger of CPI (ML) People’s War Group, and Maoist Communist Center (MCC). With the merger, it was announced that Marxism-Leninism-Maoism would be the new ideological basis of the CPI (Maoists) and its avowed aim was to seize power from the state through ‘protracted armed struggle’. Given the propensities of the ultra-leftist parties to split on flimsiest reasons, who does the government talk to, because some or the other group will never accept any peace process and therefore violence will continue.

Maoists-China Nexus

Moreover, any ism does engender violent ultra streams like ULFA from the Assam Gano Parishad (AGP) or NSCN (IM) and NSCN (K) from Naga National Council (NNC). The rise of the Maoists should be seen in that overall perspective. The common thread running through these organizations is China. A senior ex-official of the Intelligence Bureau, Maloy Krishna Dhar, wrote in the Nepal Monitor on November 2009, “I have highlighted the facts of existence of Maoists groups in the Northeast and Bangladesh as well as Nepal to emphasize the fact that sophisticated weapons are inducted by Indian Maoists from Chinese arms paddling mafia through Maoists in Manipur, Nagaland and Assam.

1 2 3
Rate this Article
Star Rating Loader Please wait...
The views expressed are of the author and do not necessarily represent the opinions or policies of the Indian Defence Review.

About the Author

RSN Singh

is a former military intelligence officer who later served in the Research and Analysis Wing, or R&AW and author of books Asian Strategic and Military Perspective and The Military Factor in Pakistan. His latest book is The Unmaking of Nepal.

More by the same author

Post your Comment

2000characters left